Health Insurance Tips for the Self-Employed

self-employedBeing self-employed has lots of perks. You get to choose your own hours, hire whomever you want, and be your own boss. The downside is that your job doesn’t provide health insurance.  And if you own a small business, you’re probably too busy to even think about health insurance!

Most self-employed individuals just don’t have health insurance. The last thing you want is for a medical emergency to impede your flourishing new business. You need to have a backup plan in case of an emergency that involves you, your family, or injuries that may put your business at risk.

If you are currently uninsured and looking for health insurance, make sure to shop around first and consider all your options. Ask other business owners for advice. You can use the Internet to compare rates and find trusted licensed agents (like eHealthInsurance.com).

Assistance for workers who are retrenched or in career transition

If your self-employment stemmed from being laid off, there is another option available to you. COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act) is a federal program that allows individuals to temporarily extend the insurance they had through previous employment (at their own cost). The federal government offers a 65% subsidy for COBRA premiums, making this a great option for many. COBRA is most attractive to those with pre-existing medical conditions that make it hard for them to qualify for coverage in other programs.

Look out for rate guarantees and tax deductions

When you decide to buy private health insurance, remember that the insurance company may increase your monthly premiums once in awhile. To protect yourself from this trick, look for a “rate guarantee.” Licensed health insurance agents can give you advice on which company to use and help you understand all the little details. Some companies offer to lock in your rate for a certain period of time if you pay a “small fee” each month. Do the math before you sign to ensure that you are actually saving money.

Some states allow qualified self-employed individuals to deduct health insurance premiums on their federal tax returns. There are rules to follow – make sure to ask a tax professional if you have any questions. Remember that you can’t deduct any money during any period of time in which you were eligible to participate in a health insurance plan sponsored by another employer.  A tax professional can also teach you about all the different types of self-employment statuses in your state and the associated tax implications.

Health Savings Account

A Health Savings Account (HSA) is a good idea for many self-employed individuals. This account is set up with an HSA-eligible health insurance program. Compared to other plans, HSAs usually have high deductibles and low monthly premiums. With an HSA, you can deposit some of your pre-tax income into a savings account so that it can earn tax-free interest. You can use then that money to pay for medical expenses like copayments and deductibles. The money you don’t use builds up tax-free year by year.

No matter what type of health insurance you end up purchasing, make sure to speak with a health insurance agent and a tax professional so that you save as much money as possible. With a good health insurance program and peace of mind, you will have more time to focus on what’s really important: your business.

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About Michael Drezner

Michael holds a degree in Journalism, and is currently the Senior Editor for Augusta Focus. Besides writing, Michael is also an avid photographer and enjoys travelling. Connect with Michael on Google+

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2 Responses to “Health Insurance Tips for the Self-Employed”

  1. Mark Hostens Says:

    So glad I came across this article! I was ‘forced’ to become self-employed recently having being made redundant by my company. After having no luck finding another job, I decided to pursue a realtor license. Didn’t know about the existence of COBRA before…kinda relieved that this sort of assistance is available

    Reply

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